Interested in Participating?

A clinical trial is now available for those whose cancer has spread to the skin and hasn’t responded to other treatments.

T

he pancreas is one of those body parts that people don’t know much about. Contrary to the heart or the lungs, which we feel every day working in our bodies, the pancreas is a silent gland that rarely gets mentioned.

The pancreas is a located in the abdomen, nestled between the stomach, the spleen, the small intestine, and the gallbladder, and it plays a crucial role in regulating your blood sugar levels. The other main function of the pancreas is to aid with digestion.

What Is Pancreatic Cancer?

As with most other types of cancer, pancreatic cancer occurs when cells in the pancreas begin to grow and divide at an abnormal and uncontrolled rate, forming one or several growths called tumors. However, normal cells should only grow and divide when the body needs to replace them because others have died out.

The reasons why pancreatic cancer occurs are not fully understood; it is estimated that 5 to 10% of pancreatic cancer cases can be attributed to genetic or hereditary factors, however, the rest of the cases seem to occur at random.

There are a few factors that may increase the risk of developing pancreatic cancer, including obesity, diabetes, smoking, eating processed meats, and being over the age of 60. However, a direct relationship between pancreatic cancer and these factors has yet to be established.

Pancreatic cancer is diagnosed through a combination of clinical history, imaging tests to look for any tumors or masses in or around the pancreas, lab tests, and a biopsy of any masses that were found.

Unfortunately, pancreatic cancer doesn’t produce many symptoms until it has reached a very advanced stage so it is very hard to diagnose it early. This is one of the reasons why this is one of the most aggressive types of cancer. It is estimated that 23% of individuals survive one year after the diagnosis, and only 8% are living five years post-diagnosis.

Match to Pancreatic Cancer Clinical Trials

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Pancreatic Cancer Clinical Trials

Contrary to popular belief, clinical trials are not always carried out to evaluate new drugs or medications. Some cancer clinical trials have been designed to improve the way doctors diagnose pancreatic cancer and to look for ways to diagnose the disease early in order to improve the patient’s prognosis.

When you decide to enroll in a clinical trial, the first thing the research staff will ask you to do is to sign an informed consent form. An informed consent form is a document that explains all the benefits and risks associated with participating in a research study, and your signature will let the research team and regulatory agencies know that you have been informed and have voluntarily agreed to participate.

Signing an informed consent form doesn’t mean that you are not free to withdraw from the study at any point in time. Clinical research is always voluntary, and if you decide to stop participating in a clinical trial you are free to do so at any time, without facing any medical or legal consequences.

All clinical trials are different, so while some clinical trials only evaluate the participants a few times per week or per month, other studies (especially cancer clinical trials) are inpatient clinical trials, which mean that the participant will be admitted to the hospital for the duration of the study.

ClinicalTrials.gov: Recruiting Studies | Pancreatic Cancer | Last update posted in the last 300 days Studies found on ClinicalTrials.gov by a search of: Recruiting Studies | Pancreatic Cancer | Last update posted in the last 300 days

  • Enhanced Outpatient Symptom Management to Reduce Acute Care Visits Due to Chemotherapy-Related Adverse Events
    on September 9, 2021 at 4:00 pm

    Conditions:   Clinical Stage IV Esophageal Adenocarcinoma AJCC v8;   Clinical Stage IV Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v8;   Clinical Stage IV Gastric Cancer AJCC v8;   Clinical Stage IVA Esophageal Adenocarcinoma AJCC v8;   Clinical Stage IVA Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v8;   Clinical Stage IVA Gastric Cancer AJCC v8;   Clinical Stage IVB Esophageal Adenocarcinoma AJCC v8;   Clinical Stage IVB Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v8;   Clinical Stage IVB Gastric Cancer AJCC v8;   Metastatic Colon Carcinoma;   Metastatic Esophageal Carcinoma;   Metastatic Gastric Carcinoma;   Metastatic Liver Carcinoma;   Metastatic Malignant Digestive System Neoplasm;   Metastatic Malignant Small Intestinal Neoplasm;   Metastatic Malignant Thoracic Neoplasm;   Metastatic Pancreatic Carcinoma;   Metastatic Rectal Carcinoma;   Pathologic Stage IV Esophageal Adenocarcinoma AJCC v8;   Pathologic Stage IV Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v8;   Pathologic Stage IV Gastric Cancer AJCC v8;   Pathologic Stage IVA Esophageal Adenocarcinoma AJCC v8;   Pathologic Stage IVA Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v8;   Pathologic Stage IVB Esophageal Adenocarcinoma AJCC v8;   Pathologic Stage IVB Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v8;   Postneoadjuvant Therapy Stage IV Esophageal Adenocarcinoma AJCC v8;   Postneoadjuvant Therapy Stage IV Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v8;   Postneoadjuvant Therapy Stage IV Gastric Cancer AJCC v8;   Postneoadjuvant Therapy Stage IVA Esophageal Adenocarcinoma AJCC v8;   Postneoadjuvant Therapy Stage IVA Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v8;   Postneoadjuvant Therapy Stage IVB Esophageal Adenocarcinoma AJCC v8;   Postneoadjuvant Therapy Stage IVB Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v8;   Stage IV Colon Cancer AJCC v8;   Stage IV Hepatocellular Carcinoma AJCC v8;   Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer AJCC v8;   Stage IV Rectal Cancer AJCC v8;   Stage IV Small Intestinal, Esophageal, Colorectal, Mesenteric, and Peritoneal Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor AJCC v8;   Stage IVA Colon Cancer AJCC v8;   Stage IVA Hepatocellular Carcinoma AJCC v8;   Stage IVA Rectal Cancer AJCC v8;   Stage IVB Colon Cancer AJCC v8;   Stage IVB Hepatocellular Carcinoma AJCC v8;   Stage IVB Rectal Cancer AJCC v8;   Stage IVC Colon Cancer AJCC v8;   Stage IVC Rectal Cancer AJCC v8Interventions:   Other: Best Practice;   Procedure: Patient Monitoring;   Other: Questionnaire AdministrationSponsor:   M.D. Anderson Cancer CenterRecruiting

  • [68Ga]Ga-HBED-CC-exendin-4 and [68Ga]Ga-NOTA-exendin-4 PET/CT Imaging in the Same Group of Insulinoma Patients
    on September 5, 2021 at 4:00 pm

    Condition:   InsulinomaInterventions:   Drug: [68Ga]Ga-HBED-CC-exendin-4;   Drug: [68Ga]Ga-NOTA-exendin-4Sponsor:   Peking Union Medical College HospitalRecruiting

  • Albumin-bound Paclitaxel Combined With Gemcitabine First-line Inoperable Locally Advanced or Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer
    on September 5, 2021 at 4:00 pm

    Condition:   Pancreatic CancerIntervention:   Drug: albumin-bound paclitaxel + gemcitabineSponsor:   Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and HospitalRecruiting

  • Pancreatic Cancer Screening for At-risk Individuals
    on August 16, 2021 at 4:00 pm

    Condition:   Pancreatic Cancer, AdultIntervention:   Other: Screening for pancreatic cancerSponsors:   Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center;   Wake Forest University Health Sciences;   Washington University School of Medicine;   Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/NorthwellRecruiting

  • Pancreatic Cancer and Oral Microbiome
    on August 6, 2021 at 4:00 pm

    Conditions:   Oral Microbiome;   Pancreatic Cancer;   IPMN;   ParodontopathyInterventions:   Diagnostic Test: Dental plaque sampling;   Diagnostic Test: qPCRSponsor:   Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Integrata VeronaRecruiting

  • Endoscopic Ultrasound Guided- Radiofrequency Ablation Pancreas Cancer Trial
    on August 4, 2021 at 4:00 pm

    Condition:   Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma (PDAC)Intervention:   Procedure: Endoscopic Ultrasound (EUS) Radiofrequency Ablation (RFA)Sponsor:   The University of Texas Health Science Center, HoustonRecruiting

  • A Study of the Safety and Tolerance of CAN04 in Combination With FOLFIRINOX in Subjects With Metastatic Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma
    on August 4, 2021 at 4:00 pm

    Condition:   Metastatic Pancreatic Ductal AdenocarcinomaInterventions:   Drug: CAN04;   Drug: FOLFIRINOXSponsor:   Cantargia ABRecruiting

  • Complication of Pancreatic Fistula and Bleeding After Pancreaticoduodenectomy in Treatment Periampullary Cancer
    on August 2, 2021 at 4:00 pm

    Conditions:   Periampullary Cancer;   Pancreatic Fistula;   BleedingIntervention:   Procedure: PancreaticoduodenectomySponsor:   Vo Truong QuocRecruiting

  • Survival Rate and Treatment Cost in Patients With Pancreatic Cancer With the Advent of New Chemotherapeutic Agents in Korea: An Analysis Using NHIS Database and K-PaC Registry Focusing on the Newest One, Liposomal Irinotecan
    on July 30, 2021 at 4:00 pm

    Condition:   Pancreatic CancerIntervention:   Sponsors:   National Cancer Center, Korea;   Seoul National University Bundang HospitalRecruiting

  • The Clinical Application of 68Ga-NOTA-exendin-4 PET/CT in Detecting Insulinoma
    on July 28, 2021 at 4:00 pm

    Condition:   InsulinomaIntervention:   Drug: 68Ga-NOTA-exendin-4Sponsor:   First Affiliated Hospital of Fujian Medical UniversityRecruiting

  • Comparison of Two Types of Biopsy Needles for EUS-FNB in Solid Pancreatobiliary Mass Lesions
    on July 23, 2021 at 4:00 pm

    Condition:   Pancreatic NeoplasmsIntervention:   Device: Fine needle biopsySponsor:   University of TehranRecruiting

  • Adagrasib in Combination With BI 1701963 in Patients With Cancer (KRYSTAL 14)
    on July 23, 2021 at 4:00 pm

    Conditions:   Advanced Cancer;   Metastatic Cancer;   Malignant Neoplasm of Colon;   Malignant Neoplasm of Lung;   Malignant Neoplastic DiseaseInterventions:   Drug: MRTX849;   Drug: BI 1701963Sponsors:   Mirati Therapeutics Inc.;   Boehringer IngelheimRecruiting

Interested in Participating?

A clinical trial is now available for those whose cancer has spread to the skin and hasn’t responded to other treatments.

Are There Any Risks of Participating in a Clinical Trial?

When a clinical trial is ready to recruit volunteers, it means that the research team has spent a long time (usually years) investigating the potential medication in a lab. During that time, the treatment was tested in animals for safety and toxicity, and it met all the requirements for human subject testing mandated by internal and third-party regulatory entities.

Going through all these regulations and phases ensure that the clinical trial posses the minimal amount of risk possible for all participants. However, as it is the case of any medication (and especially experimental ones) there is always a risk for unexpected side effects, allergies, etc. so research staff is always on call in case anything happens to a participant.

Where Can I Find a Pancreatic Cancer Clinical Trial?

Hospitals and universities are always conducting research studies and clinical trials, so if you are interested in learning more about becoming a research volunteer you can call your local hospital or university. Additionally, if you or a loved one is a pancreatic cancer patient, your oncologist might be the right person to ask about clinical trial.

Match to Pancreatic Cancer Clinical Trials

  • Access to cutting-edge treatments
  • Latest clinical trials
  • Find trials in your area